Week of Review: September 2-8, 2018

Labor Day week is always an odd one. You get a day off, which is great, but it means you feel a day off the entire rest of the week. Tuesday, masked as a Monday.

Life of Lizzie

What a week. We got through her growth spurt to find out this was definitely a brain development phase. She’s been talking almost non-stop, making various levels of sense. She gets distracted halfway through a sentence and restarts. Patience is also thin, with everything being very hard to handle when it doesn’t go her way.

We survived, though, and she even made to her very first movie in a theater with her BFF. Lizzie kept jumping into our laps when there was a loud or otherwise scary bit and doing her normal asking of questions through. Lessons learned: 1. Sit her between us and 2. Remove her light-up shoes before the movie starts.

On the Needles

Lots of knitting this week.

I finished two of the same pattern, Dotted Rays by Stephen West. The first was for Lizzie in Kelborne Wools Mojave, in three color-blocked colors. The second is in the Hot Mama colorway of Periwinkle Sheep Watercolors.

I also got some great FO photos of the three hats I finished recently. These were the Sockhead Slouch in Miss Babs, a simple 1×1 ribbing hat (on the right in the second photo) in Socks That Rock Lightweight in Islands in the Stream, and Wurm in the same yarn.

Adventures

Our adventure this week was down to Florida to visit my parents and to celebrate my birthday. We went to the beach and in the pool, ate seafood and key lime pie, played cards, and enjoyed relaxing. I was also able to get together for coffee with an old friend.

Discoveries

  • Household Name podcast on Stitcher
  • Simply Lemonade rediscovery)

Ugh. Sigh. Oye.

It was very hot and humid this week which meant lots of sweating going to meetings or just existing. Happy for cool bubble baths and iced drinks.

Better Me

Very good weekly this week, in terms of symptoms. Very not good week this week, in terms of healthy food choices. But next week is another chance to make good choices.

On Tap

  • Seeing Hamilton at the Kennedy Center
  • Friend from California visiting
  • Finishing up architecture products for project at work (hopefully)
Week of Review: September 2-8, 2018

FO Friday: Twofer

I have two finished objects to share today which is pretty remarkable, given my inability to focus on projects lately.

Campside

The first FO is a large shawl I made for a coworker who wears lots of clothing on this color palette and loves scarves.

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The pattern is a free one, Campside by Alicia Plummer. It starts with a stockinette section that’s followed by four sets of eyelet sections, each with fewer stitches between the eyelets than the previous section. It ends with ribbing which I really like the look of on a simple shawl. I blocked it gently and it still wound up huge, 56″ across and 25″ tall. My poor coworker can get eaten by the thing!

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I could not get my phone to take a picture accurately of the color, which is a heathery purple with lots of red in it. Regardless, I really love how it turned out and will certainly be making something using this pattern again.

Vestigial

The second FO is a pair of socks in a pattern I’ve not used before, Vestigial by Beata Jezek. While it’s a simple enough pattern to memorize, I did mess up a few times. I did them toe-up with a short row heel as I didn’t want to have to do any complicated counting.

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As usual, these took a month to knit because I got bored after the first sock. Maybe I should have two pairs of socks in rotation?

I’ll be back on Sunday with a review of the week which will have some other knitting content.

FO Friday: Twofer

Rainbow Days

Do you craft projects tend to grab onto a particular color palate and not let go? For me, lately, my colors have gone to rainbows.

It started when Neighborhood Fiber Company started offering their Marriage Equality colorway (for the third? fourth? time). I bought two kits of the gradient (DK and Sock), happy to both support the benefiting LGBTQA orgnization and have some of the wonderful, vibrant colors. I’ve now used them for a handful of projects – and still have a good 1/3 of the DK left!

(These photos are all of me wearing the items versus my usual slightly nicer shots but I’ve been feeling lazy.)

Everyday Shawl

(Rav project)

This was a really meditative knit. I worked on it during conference calls at work and occasionally at home in July. The recipient was complaining that she’s always cold – hopefully this has kept her warm!

Lizzie’s Rainbow Scarf

I really just sort of made this up as I went along, roughly following the Tale as Old as Time pattern. My project page for it (here) has all the details. Made using the NFC DK weight.

Rainbow Hat

I think I may be almost over my inability to do colorwork. This was made in DK and I just sort of made up the pattern (and the crown shaping, hence the wonkiness of it!).

Rainbow Days

Harvest-a-Long: Lessons Learned

There’s a concept used in my industry, probably from a business book no one can remember the name of anymore, known as Lessons Learned. When you finish up a project, the team gets together and thinks about how things could go better the next time. Sure, some whining happens, but the focus is on how you can do things differently to make it all go better next time. 

Lessons learned apply to crafts, too. 

I learn something with every project. Sometimes it’s something little, like that a particular yarn likes to split so the lesson learned is to use a needle with rounded, rather than sharp, tips. Sometimes it’s something you can’t believe you never thought to do differently. 

My Harvest sweater left me some major lessons learned.  Lessons I thought I had learned before. 

*sigh*

Thing is, my sweater doesn’t fit me. I chose the wrong size to make. Got gauge, followed the directions. Doesn’t fit. 

Yep, I wrote a whole post about measuring yourself and choosing a size. Yet, I made the wrong one for me. 

I chose the size exactly the same as my chest measurement, measuring around my widest point in my chest. This means that there was zero ease. 

Lesson One: Cotton does not stretch

Next time I work with this yarn or another cotton, I should add at least and extra inch to account for the fact cotton does not stretch. (And maybe add a bit more if I intend to throw it in the dryer when I’m too impatient to let it dry flat.)

Lesson Two: Remember your body type

Unlike the standard person sweaters are designed for, I have broad shoulders and, well, a small chest. In the future, I need to account for this. 

Amy Herzog has an amazing blog series called Fit to Flatter which is also available in book form. In the post on choosing your sweater size, she describes how to take a better measurement than the tradition chest one. I won’t rehash what she says, but the lesson from Amy for me is that I often need to knit a size or two larger than the pattern calls for. 

The Sweater

I tried on the sweater and even wore it a few times before blocking it. From the start, it felt tight across my shoulders and I couldn’t quite close it. After blocking it via washer and dryer, it is not at all flattering. And, worse, it’s just not comfortable. Here’s a photo I took of me trying it on, about the only photo I have of me wearing it. Notice how it won’t close, yet bunches at my armpits. Signs of a poor fit. 


Don’t worry, though, the sweater will not be relegated to the back of my closet. I’m lucky to have a friend for whom the sweater is a perfect fit. It’s actually winging its way across town (so more like fighting I-66 traffic) to my friend KO to keep her warm on chilly days at work. 

I will knit myself another sweater one of these days. And I will remember my lessons learned.  (Either way, I’ll blog about it, you can be sure.)

Harvest-a-Long: Lessons Learned

Harvest-a-long: Finale!

Congrats, you’ve made it to the end of your cardigan! You’ve finished knitting it! Oh, blocking, you say? Yeah…that.

I have to admit, I’m rather bad at blocking things which are lace or socks. Lace is straight-forward – you use wires or pins and stretch it out until the straight lines all line up and your lace has “opened up” as much as you’d like. Socks, you just wet, throw them onto a blocking mat, and wait forever for them to dry.

This sweater, well, it’s a bit harder. If you’re yarn is not machine washable and dryable – like mine – you’ll want to block it by laying it flat on a level surface. I won’t go into the details though Tin Cat Knits offers advice on the pattern and you can Google it. Just know that blocking your sweater is important and, like ironing in sewing, gives you the best final product. Take your time. Don’t pull it up until it’s TOTALLY dry, no matter how tempted you may be to wear it ever-so-slightly damp.

Next time, I hope to share photos of my finished sweater and, in a few weeks, those of my friends and coworkers I somehow convinced to do this with me. For now, you can laugh at the photo I took just after I wore the ends in my sweater, on a train full of commuters from York to London.

Harvest-a-long: Finale!

FO Friday: Sockalicious

I think I’ve mentioned that I got back into socks when we were in Germany. I’ll write more about that part of things in my posts about the trip, starting next week. But, I do want to share with you the three pairs I’ve finished lately.

German Monkeys

As you could guess, I made these while in Germany. More specifically, I made them from German sock yarn and needles bought while there. They were made in record time, just two weeks and I wasn’t even knitting on them that whole time. Of course, I was on vacation, away from the rigors of normal life and Lizzie keeping me from knitting…

(You can see all of the details here.)

(Finally Finished) Mercury Socks

These were the socks I last worked on…and didn’t finish. After I got back home, I had to get them finished. These will eventually get sent on to my cousin for her birthday. I’d point you to my Rav project page for these to get the details but I never wound up writing down the yarn I used so I’ll just link to the pattern page.

Lizzie’s Everyday Socks

I’ve never made Lizzie socks and she kept asking me to make her a pair when she saw me working on finishing up the ones for my cousin. I chose the Hermoine’s Everyday Socks pattern because it was easy but also would show off the tonal nature of the yarn I was using.

(You can see all of the details here.)

FO Friday: Sockalicious

FO Friday: Dishcloths Aplenty

Matt’s cousin got married a few weeks ago. Instead of the usual gift registry, the couple asked folks to make them things. I instantly thought of dishcloths. Everyone in his family loves using them and I have a giant amount of dishcloth cotton in my stash.

Thing is, I hate working with the stuff. Really hate it. It hurts my hands and sticks to my needles. And the dishcloths, meh, not too exciting. I have nice variegated colors which mean I’m limited to only textured patterns, even more boring.

But I love the couple, so I made them. A lovely set of 8 in shades of light blue. They were gorgeous. I forgot to take a photo of them but, trust me, they were lovely.

Then, for who knows what reason, I kept knitting them. The entire way back from Indiana (about 10 hours), then again once I got home for a good week. I wound up with a ton more – some to a family member, some to a coworker, and the ones shown here, not yet with a destination.

There wasn’t a lot of thought to these, in terms of what I was going to do. I start with however many stitches – 28 if I’m making a regular square vice a mitered one – then pick a pattern and knit is until I have a square. The miters are started with 3 stitches, knit until I feel like decreasing, then finished with 3 stitches.

There’s something really satisfying about these. They take only an hour or so, depending if I’m in the car on Lizzie Entertainment duty (lots of handing her books and snacks and answering “what’s that?”) or watching World Series baseball. I think they’ll be filling my “I have no idea what to knit next.” spot.

FO Friday: Dishcloths Aplenty